Mural Project to Honor Langhorne Women

This is a view of the three visible sides of the mural-covered box near the entrance of the Mayors Playground on E. Maple Avenue near the intersection with Pine Street (Rt 413). Jean-Marc Dubus used Hicks' iconic painting, "The Peaceable Kingdom"  to welcome passersby to the historic district of Langhorne Borough!

Langhorne Council for the Arts


The year 2020 marked the 100th Anniversary of the passage of the 19th Amendment which guaranteed women the right to vote. This only happened because women were tenacious in their 80-year fight, battling against society's norms and facing personal sacrifice for the greater good.  In looking at the history of women from Langhorne, we realized that there are remarkable women from this area who exemplify this same kind of tenacity and accomplishment with far-reaching effects. And so, the idea of a Women's Mural was born. Designed and painted by Jean-Marc Dubus with input and guidance from Florence Wharton and Pat Mervine, this mural was installed on the back of the Will Travel building and was dedicated on August 28, 2022.  You can read about the women honored on this mural by clicking HERE or by scanning the QR Code on the mural when viewing in person.  View the mural from the parking lot side of the Will Travel Building (118 S. Bellevue Avenue, directly across the street from the mural at the Hicks House). 



Designed and painted by Langhorne mural artist Jean-Marc Dubus, this large mural is on the parking lot side of the Hicks House (corner of Maple and Bellevue Avenues) where Edward Hicks was born.  It features a replica of the window on the Bellevue Avenue side of the building with the portrait of Edward Hicks that was painted by his cousin. The sign reflects Hicks' occupation as a sign and carriage painter, a trade he learned in a carriage shop once located behind the Langhorne Hotel. The lion, as a work in progress, is emblematic of the many versions of the painting Hicks is most famous for: "The Peaceable Kingdom."

Mural Project to Honor Edward Hicks

This mural on the box in front of the Langhorne Hotel (corner of Maple and Bellevue Avenues) features Edward Hicks' painting of "Washington at the Delaware." Five buildings in the area are listed on the side of the box. All had been used as hospitals for soldiers injured at the Battles of Trenton. This reminds all who pass by of Langhorne's connection to the​ American Revolution.  A whimsical scene on the back of the box, painted by Jean-Marc Dubus, is a toast to Langhorne Hotel's most famous bartender.